Nestled in the restaurant row that makes up part of the Sherman Oaks Galleria lies an unassuming eatery called Townhouse Kitchen and Bar. Opened in late winter, Townhouse has hit the ground running in an attempt to please whatever type of customer should stroll in, offering a varied menu with an even more detailed beer and wine list.

Hailing from the Midwest by Chicago, the designers made sure to keep the urban feel – hardwood floors, windows for walls and cozy booths and high top tables. The place is over 7,000 square feet, but somehow manages to not be overwhelming or off-putting when you walk in.

From small plates and sliders to Townhouse specialties and Happy Endings, Townhouse is definitely not lacking in the options department. One of the only drawbacks about being so varied is sometimes the restaurant might lose its identity, but in this case, Townhouse has a good shot of avoiding that misstep.

On the right track are their small plates, especially the Lettuce Wraps, which feature fresh, chopped ahi tuna, pickled ginger, coleslaw with Asian flavors and Sriracha sauce for a little heat. Pair that with a glass of Flirtatious Blonde (white wine) or a microbrew like Rogue Dead Guy Ale from Oregon and you’re on your way to fun.

I haven’t seen deviled eggs served in a restaurant in … maybe ever, but these were pretty flavorful. They seem more like a Happy Hour type of offering, and guess what? They are.

Speaking of Happy Hour, it’s a great deal and the best introduction to Townhouse. Specialty drinks like the aptly named Decadent Chocolate Martini (Absolut Vanilla, Godiva Liqueurs, hello!), the crisp Cucumber Martini and my personal favorite, the Dirty CEO Martini, are just $5. You can also order great beers from 30 different types for $5, as well as the ever-popular sliders that are anything but ordinary.

For instance, the lobster cake sliders have an Asian inspiration with Thai chili lime sauce, but the angry shrimp are more Latin-infused with habanero sauce and pepper jack. I tried the pork belly sliders and was disappointed; only because it was mostly pulled pork with a chunk of “belly” in the middle; it kind of defeated the purpose of crisp pork belly. All of the sliders are offered with fried onion rings that resemble shoestring fries, eh … I like my fried food thick.

The “Two-Handed Sandwiches” live up to their name, with portions guaranteed to make sure you don’t leave hungry. The Grilled Portobello came packed with appealing accoutrements like spinach, Brie and a tomato Kalamata olive mixture. The star sandwiches are definitely the Prime Dip, consisting of thinly sliced prime goodness, Swiss cheese and grilled onions on a baguette, and the Angus Burger served on slightly sweet brioche bread. All of the sandwiches do come with fries, the kind with substance and seasoning.

It’s the Townhouse specialties that need a little work. Sesame-crusted Hay Tuna with corn and pepper relish would be even better if the vegetables were roasted. The Swiss chard that accompanies this dish is sautéed with ginger and was so full of flavor, it almost seemed like the plate should have been renamed Ginger Swiss Chard with Tuna – it was really the highlight of the components on the plate.

Not to be taken lightly was the Mac & Cheese with two white cheeses, Gruyere and white Cheddar to be exact. On its own it was good, but spend the extra cash and add lobster and you’ve got yourself a quite decadent entrée. I like the fact that you can order sides like steamed broccoli, black beans and rice and that delicious Swiss chard should you choose to add a bit to your generous plate.

As for the Happy Endings, well you will have to experience for yourself the chocolate cake bites with pureed raspberries, or the blondie-tini sundae, white chocolate brownies paired with ice creams and chocolate sauce. Need I say more?

And starting today through March 21, celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with their Celtic-inspired dishes paired with signature brews from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. daily.



For more information, call (818) 453-9900 or visit restaurants-america.com.